Voices From The Fuselage// Odyssey: The Founder Of Dreams [Album Review]

December 11, 2018

Band: Voices From The Fuselage

Release: “Odyssey: The Founder Of Dreams” Album

Area: Northamptonshire, UK

Date of release: November 9th

Genre: Progressive Metal

Reviewer: Lauren Coleman

Mixer: Voices From The Fuselage and John Mitchell

Masterer: Voices From The Fuselage and John Mitchell 

For fans of: The Contortionist, Tesseract, Earthside

 

 

 

 

"Do you know the truth, do you know the truth? No.

The truth is that you're doomed if you do."

 

 

Voices From The Fuselage, a progressive metal band from Northamptonshire, UK, have just released their sophomore album “Odyssey: The Founder Of Dreams”; two years since the release of “Odyssey: Destroyer Of Worlds”.

 

The album begins with 'Via', a very gentle way of opening the album. The vocals sit so nicely with this mix and it is almost transcendental as it slowly progresses along. The embellishment of the vocal harmonies, strings and piano are incredibly moving. The beat begins and it reminds me of early The Contortionist and I'm instantly familiarised with the kind of progressive metal I'm about to dive into.

 

The first half of the album did happen a little slowly and I did find myself wondering when the vocalist Ashe O’Hara was going to break out into a belt. I felt his vocals can be very restricted because of the mix; which is unfortunate because he does have a beautiful voice. I reflected on this once listening to the entire album and it definitely carried the album through very nicely and I could really appreciate the melodic choices after completing it.

 

'Nine Levels' was another song that caught my attention, following up with it was 'Vault of Heaven' which is truly a beautiful song, it had a pure angelic element to it. It was at that point when I consciously grabbed my phone to make a mental note of the song, that I noticed the second song was named “Vestibule of Hell” and I realised the concept behind this album.

 

The first half is representative of "heaven"; slow songs with delicate vocals and a lot of space. The second half is representative of "hell"; punchier guitar tones, thick drum patterns and - what felt like a lifetime of waiting - the release of Ashe O'Haras vocals, breaking into those belts we ever so longed for. Just like their album before, there are many references to religion; though I do believe they're using it in a broader and more philosophical sense, as opposed to organised religion.

 

I began to anticipate the coming song “Vestibule of Hell” and it did not disappoint. The execution of this was done so well. The moment the song begins you notice the change from the production having much more grit and boom, the guitar tones becoming a lot more heavier and the drum patterns filling the spaces that were once filled with echoes and silence.

 

The highlight song of the album for me personally was "Domus". It certainly made me feel all sorts of things and it has creeped it's way onto my go-to playlist. What makes this song stand out for me is the emotion that is conveyed through the long, drawn out notes playing behind a shrill riff, and the rhythm change in the vocals as Ashe belts "Second guessing me, double crossing you". Then one last uplifting moment at the end as the key changes, for one last epic chorus.

 

A noteworthy mention to "Desitute" as I thoroughly enjoyed the orchestral hits in the build up. The use of orchestral music throughout is something that significantly stands out to me. Not for what it is, but for how it is used. For example the beginning of "Machina" makes me feel like I'm running through the fields of The Shire, in search for Gandalf to help me understand what to do with this golden ring... "Machina" is a strong finishing song.

 

The very minor downfall to this album was the production, it could do with more clarity and space with the layers. It was hard to distinguish the lyrics being sung as well as the ornamentation throughout the songs; mostly the lead melodies. There are many intricate layers here in the mix, but they unfortunately haven’t been given the opportunity to shine as much as I feel like they could have.

 

Over all, Voices From The Fuselage have done incredibly well with their second album, with each song igniting something from within me, which I will always appreciate; technicalities aside, I thoroughly enjoyed this album.

 

Vocals: 9/10

Guitars: 8.5/10

Bass: 9/10

Drums: 8.5/10

Lyrics: 4/5

Would You Go And See Them (WYGAST): 4.5/5

Mixing: 8.5/10

Production: 16/20

Structure: 19/20

Overall: 86/100

 

Personal Enjoyment: 9/10

 

 

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